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Is A Pregnant Mummy Called A "Mommy?"
#1

Is A Pregnant Mummy Called A "Mommy?"
https://gizmodo.com/this-is-the-first-kn...1846810930

Quote:This Is the First Known Pregnant Mummy


Quote:A radiological examination of a 2,000-year-old mummy presumed to be a male priest shows it’s actually the preserved remains of a woman—and a pregnant one at that.
New research in the Journal of Archaeological Science documents the “first known case of a pregnant embalmed body,” as the archaeologists, led by Wojciech Ejsmond from the Warsaw Mummy Project, write in their study.
Originally dubbed “mummy of a lady,” the linen-wrapped body was donated to the University of Warsaw in 1826. During the 1920s, and then again in the 1960s, hieroglyphics on the coffin were translated to “Hor-Djehuty,” which corresponds to the name of a male Egyptian priest. Radiological scans made in the 1990s further reinforced the interpretation of the mummy as being male, but the “current research proves that the sex of the mummy is undoubtably female,” as the archaeologists write in their study.
Robert G. Ingersoll : “No man with a sense of humor ever founded a religion.”
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#2

Is A Pregnant Mummy Called A "Mommy?"
(05-03-2021, 05:16 PM)Minimalist Wrote: https://gizmodo.com/this-is-the-first-kn...1846810930

Quote:This Is the First Known Pregnant Mummy


Quote:A radiological examination of a 2,000-year-old mummy presumed to be a male priest shows it’s actually the preserved remains of a woman—and a pregnant one at that.
New research in the Journal of Archaeological Science documents the “first known case of a pregnant embalmed body,” as the archaeologists, led by Wojciech Ejsmond from the Warsaw Mummy Project, write in their study.
Originally dubbed “mummy of a lady,” the linen-wrapped body was donated to the University of Warsaw in 1826. During the 1920s, and then again in the 1960s, hieroglyphics on the coffin were translated to “Hor-Djehuty,” which corresponds to the name of a male Egyptian priest. Radiological scans made in the 1990s further reinforced the interpretation of the mummy as being male, but the “current research proves that the sex of the mummy is undoubtably female,” as the archaeologists write in their study.

Well, it certainly wouldn't be the first case of an ancient Egyptian being buried in a borrowed coffin.
“I expect to pass this way but once; any good therefore that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now. Let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again.” (Etienne De Grellet)
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