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sharpening knives
#1

sharpening knives
What tools do you use to sharpen your knives?

What technique?

I suck at it. And I am tired of my knives getting duller and duller.
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#2

sharpening knives
This, takes longer but works for me. I oil the stone.

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#3

sharpening knives
I use a steel. Fast and sharp.
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#4

sharpening knives
That^^

After that pass it on a honing steel a few times to make perfect, also during heavy use a honing steel is perfect  to maintaim it sharp.



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#5

sharpening knives
Three passes with a steel and I could shave with my Gerber Mk. 1.
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#6

sharpening knives
Japanese sharpening stones. 240, 800, 3000 and 8000. Good enough for me (although i have a leather too). The key is to get the correct angle. Most modern knifes are sharpened ca. 15% on both sides. My super-expensive knife from Tanegashima is only angled at one side, but this is an outlier/pro tool. Girl_yes2

As for the technique....this seems to be like "what color is the best", a matter of taste, but personally id like to follow some nipponese sensei  girl blushing

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#7

sharpening knives
(06-22-2020, 05:02 PM)Gawdzilla Sama Wrote: Three passes with a steel and I could shave with my Gerber Mk. 1.

Yeah good knife,  but I use in on industrial scale. Even with judicious use of the steel, it will go beyond the capacity of it. We have the maintenance crew that have heavy equipment to sharpen them once a week.

For domestic use the honing steel and the sharpening stone are my choices.
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#8

sharpening knives
I haven't worried about it until now, mostly due to the fact that most of my knives suck, so sharpening is something of a dead-end. I've got one or two good knives, and a little doohickey sharpener with both whatchamacallits, sharpening and honing sides. I figure I'll buy a decent sharpener somewhere down the road, but probably never go the stone and strop route. I've been investing heavily in ceramics lately, and I don't even know what the care of them is supposed to be. I'll be fascinated to listen to those who know what they're doing here.
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#9

sharpening knives
(06-22-2020, 03:33 PM)Dom Wrote: What tools do you use to sharpen your knives?

What technique?

I suck at it. And I am tired of my knives getting duller and duller.

I have a knife steel.  Inherited from my mother, this thing must be at least 60 years old.  I have a good set of knives I do not abuse, and a cheap set for use on things that might damage a thin kitchen knive.  The steel does a very good job of keeping my good knives sharp.  A good knife steel does a great job.
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#10

sharpening knives
(06-22-2020, 05:02 PM)Deesse23 Wrote: Japanese sharpening stones. 240, 800, 3000 and 8000. Good enough for me (although i have a leather too). The key is to get the correct angle. Most modern knifes are sharpened ca. 15% on both sides. My super-expensive knife from Tanegashima is only angled at one side, but this is an outlier/pro tool. Girl_yes2

As for the technique....this seems to be like "what color is the best", a matter of taste, but personally id like to follow some nipponese sensei  girl blushing

Since I use scissors so much I've learned how to sharpen them and have a nice sharpening tool for that purpose. 

The Japanese make great professional scissors.  The company is called Kai and I have a pair of $90.00  Kia scissors that cut through material like butter.  I don't know what the Japanese do to make such fantastic scissors but I'm thankful they do.  I haven't had to sharpen them yet though. 

[Image: il_570xN.1535223169_5wub.jpg]

One of the problems I've had with scissors is that many are too heavy for a female hand.  I think men develope them and test them with their hand strength in mind.  But the Japanese I'm thinking have smaller hands so the Kai scissors  work better for me.  I may get another pair. 

 The Japanese have some of the most expenisve scissors in the world.  They're used to cut expensive silk for traditional kimonos and the technician can cut along one line of the woven silt thread along the fabric.  It's one of the most amazing thing on this planet. They're about $6,000 dollars and they're handed down for generations. 

A craftsman in Japan hand forges an even more expensive scissor for Bonsai plants costing up to $35,000.    That's a 35 with three zeros after it - not just two zeros.   Tongue Wink      Scissors are more difficult to make than a knife, or at least that's what this guys says. These scissors are a work of art, wow.  

                                                         T4618
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#11

sharpening knives
I use a slotted countertop sharpener, as mentioned above. My knives aren't pricey ($15 for my favorite, a santoku), and it keeps them going fine. Plus, it gets a better angle than I can get by freehand. I know this because I've ruined a couple of Buck knives trying to teach myself whetting on a stone.
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#12

sharpening knives
I take them to the sharpening guy. He does a great job.
Whistling
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#13

sharpening knives
(06-23-2020, 01:35 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote: I use a slotted countertop sharpener, as mentioned above. My knives aren't pricey ($15 for my favorite, a santoku), and it keeps them going fine. Plus, it gets a better angle than I can get by freehand. I know this because I've ruined a couple of Buck knives trying to teach myself whetting on a stone.

those are handy, provide decent results quickly, and do not require technique.  Thumbs Up

example

I have a henkels one that is good. I follow it up with a little steel work.
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#14

sharpening knives
(06-23-2020, 02:14 AM)skyking Wrote: those are handy, provide decent results quickly, and do not require technique.  Thumbs Up

example

I have a henkels one that is good. I follow it up with a little steel work.

I decided early on that other things were more important for me to learn than sharpening. Of course, my countertop sharpener is coming along with me in the Zombie Apocalypse, because it is that important.

Matter of fact I think I need to buy a spare for my bug-out bag.
Freedom isn't free.
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#15

sharpening knives
(06-23-2020, 02:19 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(06-23-2020, 02:14 AM)skyking Wrote: those are handy, provide decent results quickly, and do not require technique.  Thumbs Up

example

I have a henkels one that is good. I follow it up with a little steel work.

I decided early on that other things were more important for me to learn than sharpening. Of course, my countertop sharpener is coming along with me in the Zombie Apocalypse, because it is that important.

Matter of fact I think I need to buy a spare for my bug-out bag.

Keep prioritizing the music playing IMO Smile
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#16

sharpening knives
(06-23-2020, 02:34 AM)skyking Wrote:
(06-23-2020, 02:19 AM)Thumpalumpacus Wrote:
(06-23-2020, 02:14 AM)skyking Wrote: those are handy, provide decent results quickly, and do not require technique.  Thumbs Up

example

I have a henkels one that is good. I follow it up with a little steel work.

I decided early on that other things were more important for me to learn than sharpening. Of course, my countertop sharpener is coming along with me in the Zombie Apocalypse, because it is that important.

Matter of fact I think I need to buy a spare for my bug-out bag.

Keep prioritizing the music playing IMO Smile


Exactly, that's also why I dropped drawing and derogated poetry to the occasional quiet night. You get it.

Now to get my acoustic guitar repaired for the bug-out bag too!
Freedom isn't free.
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#17

sharpening knives
For a quick touch-up of an expensive carving knife, I use an old steel that belonged to my
grandmother's family, which has an ivory(!) handle and is probably more than 100 years old.
For a more professional edge, I take it to my local butcher who does it for free.

(Uh... a misplaced modifier?)
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#18

sharpening knives
(06-23-2020, 03:45 PM)SYZ Wrote: For a quick touch-up of an expensive carving knife, I use an old steel that belonged to my
grandmother's family, which has an ivory(!) handle and is probably more than 100 years old.  
For a more professional edge, I take it to my local butcher who does it for free.

(Uh... a misplaced modifier?)

My mom had one with an antler handle and a similar age Smile
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#19

sharpening knives
Sharpening is my new favorite subject.  
 
Steels work well for maintaining an edge on most knives. They are shit for sharpening a dull knife though, and depending on the knife steel and the heat treat may not work at all on some higher end knives. So one thing you need to think about is what am I sharpening? You can sharpen grandma's old high carbon Old Hickory knives with a rock out of the garden, but you are probably going to need ceramics or diamond if you are trying to sharpen an expensive blade made from M390 or CPM S110V. 
 
For most of my life I used oil and/or water stones to sharpen knives. A step up from traditional oil/water stones is diamond stones. Diamonds cut faster traditional stones. They cost more though, and the more expensive monocrystalline diamond stones last longer than polycrystalline diamond stones. Traditional and diamond stones work but depend on technique to get good results. The important thing when putting an edge on a knife is a repeatable angle, and a lot of people don't want to put in the time figuring out how to get repeatable results when sharpening on a fixed flat surface. 
 
These days I do most of my sharpening freehand on a 2x72 belt grinder with ceramic belts, but when I want to get something atom splitting scary sharp I use a fixed angle sharpening system that uses diamond paste on hard maple blocks. You can spend a shit load of money on something like that, but you don't need to. I'm currently using a $40 Chinese knockoff of an Edge Pro. It works really well. The stones that come with it are shit, but they work. They just wear to quickly for my purposes. The good news is they will last most people lifetime, and if they don't they can be replaced with better stones or even diamond later. 

Edge Pro Clone: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Fix-angle-Knife...2749.l2649
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#20

sharpening knives
I use knives just enough to be frustrated with a dull blade, but nowhere near enough to go all in for tools to sharpen them. The latest set of knives we got for the kitchen has a built in sharpener that does just fine for me. No more hacked up food and little hassle refreshing the edge every third or fourth time they get used.
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#21

sharpening knives
Minions. They take care of all my menial burdens.
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#22

sharpening knives
I could use a sharpened spoon.
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#23

sharpening knives
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#24

sharpening knives
(06-22-2020, 08:48 PM)Dancefortwo Wrote:
(06-22-2020, 05:02 PM)Deesse23 Wrote: Japanese sharpening stones. 240, 800, 3000 and 8000. Good enough for me (although i have a leather too). The key is to get the correct angle. Most modern knifes are sharpened ca. 15% on both sides. My super-expensive knife from Tanegashima is only angled at one side, but this is an outlier/pro tool. Girl_yes2

As for the technique....this seems to be like "what color is the best", a matter of taste, but personally id like to follow some nipponese sensei  girl blushing

Since I use scissors so much I've learned how to sharpen them and have a nice sharpening tool for that purpose. 

The Japanese make great professional scissors.  The company is called Kai and I have a pair of $90.00  Kia scissors that cut through material like butter.  I don't know what the Japanese do to make such fantastic scissors but I'm thankful they do.  I haven't had to sharpen them yet though. 

[Image: il_570xN.1535223169_5wub.jpg]

One of the problems I've had with scissors is that many are too heavy for a female hand.  I think men develope them and test them with their hand strength in mind.  But the Japanese I'm thinking have smaller hands so the Kai scissors  work better for me.  I may get another pair. 

 The Japanese have some of the most expenisve scissors in the world.  They're used to cut expensive silk for traditional kimonos and the technician can cut along one line of the woven silt thread along the fabric.  It's one of the most amazing thing on this planet. They're about $6,000 dollars and they're handed down for generations. 

A craftsman in Japan hand forges an even more expensive scissor for Bonsai plants costing up to $35,000.    That's a 35 with three zeros after it - not just two zeros.   Tongue Wink      Scissors are more difficult to make than a knife, or at least that's what this guys says. These scissors are a work of art, wow.  


I have issues keeping the scissors I use for dog grooming sharp. And it is annoying, they are not exactly cheap and they need to have blunt tips and sharp blades to work the face and around the eyes. Well, they need to be sharp working anywhere, but the face makes the dogs impatient and wriggly if I fiddle around with cuts that don't actually cut.
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#25

sharpening knives
(06-22-2020, 03:33 PM)Dom Wrote: What tools do you use to sharpen your knives?

What technique?

I suck at it. And I am tired of my knives getting duller and duller.

I have Wustoff knives for cooking, a Buck knive, and a Cold Steel Tanto. I use a stone. I have a set of knives that I allow company to use. Company does not touch my knives unless I approve. They are razor sharp.
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