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Poll: Have you tried a simulated meat product?
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I tried some, and didn't like it
18.75%
3 18.75%
I tried some, and I liked it
56.25%
9 56.25%
Not interested in trying it.
25.00%
4 25.00%
Total 16 vote(s) 100%
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Please stop trying to make fake meat
#26

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise?  Even to the
extent of forming the products into shapes resembling steaks, hamburgers, sausages, chicken
wings, and even prawns?

        Huh

And why would they think it's healthier? Meat is packed full of vitamins and minerals that are missed with fake food. For decades now people have decried eating meat and fat, blaming it for every health scare. And ever since, obesity and illnesses have shy rocketed. Some day people will bother to actually read the current science regarding what food does in our bodies - and boy, will it be an awakening. 

IMO we need humane care for animals raised for food, a good life and a good death. All life on earth depends on consumption of other life and poops out what it doesn't need, and that poop serves as food for others who then are consumed etc. Plants included, they are life that people consume. It may not be nice, but it's reality. Blame god for stupid planning if you want. 

It just is a pity that big pharma and government agencies beholden to big pharma and the food industry get away with publishing "food facts" that are just plain wrong. Do the research into scientific facts and you will realize that meat and fat (yes, fat!) are actually good for us and have zero to do with weight gain or health issues. Sugar does. And sugar is everywhere. Yesterday I looked at the Walmart website to see the labels for deli meats - since they have no labels in stores. Guess what? I could not find one out of a few dozen products, NOT ONE, that didn't contain sugar.
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#27

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise?  Even to the
extent of forming the products into shapes resembling steaks, hamburgers, sausages, chicken
wings, and even prawns?

        Huh

Do you think I became a vegetarian because steak tastes bad?
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#28

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 08:46 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise?  Even to the
extent of forming the products into shapes resembling steaks, hamburgers, sausages, chicken
wings, and even prawns?

        Huh

Do you think I became a vegetarian because steak tastes bad?

A lot of vegans say they did. We're all different...
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#29

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 09:30 AM)OakTree500 Wrote: I'm a meat eater, but more lately have moved onto "vegan" meats as it's just been slightly healthier for me. I'm not going full vegan by any stretch but am trying to pay more attention to what I eat as I get older. My local supermarket sells chicken sausages, [you can still buy pork ones], which are much lower calorie and still have a decent meaty taste accordingly.

Also recently had some meat-free burgers, which I found to be very tasty Smile

I tried Burger King's Impossible Whopper a few months ago, just as an experiment. The patty tasted more like roast pork than beef, but good nevertheless. It was a bit on the pricey side, costing about $1.35 more than a conventional Whopper. It also wasn't subject to the 2/$6 deal as the conventional Whopper. Have any vegans here tried it yet? I'd be interested in their opinions.
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#30

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 10:38 PM)Gwaithmir Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 09:30 AM)OakTree500 Wrote: I'm a meat eater, but more lately have moved onto "vegan" meats as it's just been slightly healthier for me. I'm not going full vegan by any stretch but am trying to pay more attention to what I eat as I get older. My local supermarket sells chicken sausages, [you can still buy pork ones], which are much lower calorie and still have a decent meaty taste accordingly.

Also recently had some meat-free burgers, which I found to be very tasty Smile

I tried Burger King's Impossible Whopper a few months ago, just as an experiment. The patty tasted more like roast pork than beef, but good nevertheless. It was a bit on the pricey side, costing about $1.35 more than a conventional Whopper. It also wasn't subject to the 2/$6 deal as the conventional Whopper. Have any vegans here tried it yet? I'd be interested in their opinions.

The Impossible Whopper has been brought into the two for $6 deal here, IIRC. It wasn't originally. My impression comparing the two was that the Impossible Whopper was not as juicy, and the regular Whopper tasted of fat and grease after the taste of the Impossible Whopper.
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#31

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 10:38 PM)Gwaithmir Wrote: I tried Burger King's Impossible Whopper a few months ago, just as an experiment. The patty tasted more like roast pork than beef, but good nevertheless. It was a bit on the pricey side, costing about $1.35 more than a conventional Whopper. It also wasn't subject to the 2/$6 deal as the conventional Whopper. Have any vegans here tried it yet? I'd be interested in their opinions.

Some vegans have said they won't try the Impossible Whopper until it's grilled separately from the real meat.  Apparently that affects the taste too.
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#32

Please stop trying to make fake meat
Are those hamburger buns vegan? Seems to me that a vegan person wouldn't even set foot in a Burglar King!
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#33

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 08:46 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise...

Do you think I became a vegetarian because steak tastes bad?

Unless you tell me, I can't tell why you became a vegetarian, but I'm sure you had good reasons.

But...

Animal Proteins Are Complete, But Plant Proteins Are Not

In total, there are around 20 amino acids that the human body uses to build proteins. These amino acids
are classified as either essential or non-essential. Your body can produce non-essential amino acids. However,
it cannot produce essential amino acids, which need to be obtained through your diet. For optimal health,
your body needs all the essential amino acids in the right ratios.

Animal protein sources, such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy, are similar to the protein found in your body.

These are considered to be complete sources of protein because they contain all of the essential amino
acids
that your body needs to function effectively. On the contrary, plant protein sources, such as beans,
lentils and nuts are considered to be incomplete, as they lack one or more of the essential amino acids
that your body needs.

PubMed: Jay R. Hoffman and Michael J. Falvo
I'm a creationist;   I believe that man created God.
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#34

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-18-2020, 08:57 PM)Dom Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 08:46 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise?  Even to the
extent of forming the products into shapes resembling steaks, hamburgers, sausages, chicken
wings, and even prawns?

        Huh

Do you think I became a vegetarian because steak tastes bad?

A lot of vegans say they did. We're all different...

You know people who became vegan because they didn't like how literally any meat tastes? I find that surprising, but I guess it doesn't matter.
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#35

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-19-2020, 04:37 PM)SYZ Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 08:46 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-18-2020, 03:51 PM)SYZ Wrote: Why is it that despite hating meat/animal products, so many vegans/vegetarians are desperate
to manufacture and eat non-meat products dressed up as the meat they despise...

Do you think I became a vegetarian because steak tastes bad?

Unless you tell me, I can't tell why you became a vegetarian, but I'm sure you had good reasons.

But...

Animal Proteins Are Complete, But Plant Proteins Are Not

In total, there are around 20 amino acids that the human body uses to build proteins. These amino acids
are classified as either essential or non-essential. Your body can produce non-essential amino acids. However,
it cannot produce essential amino acids, which need to be obtained through your diet. For optimal health,
your body needs all the essential amino acids in the right ratios.

Animal protein sources, such as meat, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy, are similar to the protein found in your body.

These are considered to be complete sources of protein because they contain all of the essential amino
acids
that your body needs to function effectively. On the contrary, plant protein sources, such as beans,
lentils and nuts are considered to be incomplete, as they lack one or more of the essential amino acids
that your body needs.

PubMed: Jay R. Hoffman and Michael J. Falvo

Individually, there is no plant source of protein that is complete. But if you're a good vegan, you'll consume multiple sources of plant protein, overall adding up to complete protein. Complementary proteins.

I still eat eggs though. Can't beat a good omelette. (Ha ha ha get it)
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#36

Please stop trying to make fake meat
[Image: meat-nutrients.png]
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#37

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-19-2020, 05:24 PM)Dom Wrote: [Image: meat-nutrients.png]

Fake news! Vitamin D2 is found in mushrooms! But to be fair, Vitamin D3 is the superior D. I've read that most people could use Vitamin D3 supplements regardless of diet.
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#38

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-19-2020, 06:01 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-19-2020, 05:24 PM)Dom Wrote: [Image: meat-nutrients.png]

Fake news! Vitamin D2 is found in mushrooms! But to be fair, Vitamin D3 is the superior D. I've read that most people could use Vitamin D3 supplements regardless of diet.

You can eat supplements or you can eat the real thing. Thing with supplements is that they don't deliver everything the real thing does, and nutritional science, while getting better recently, still has a lot to explore.

Me, I'd rather eat the real thing and know more about what's going into my body.

I have been starting to learn about the involved science lately, and it's amazing what all chemical reactions happen (or don't happen) depending on what you put or don't put into your mouth. It's got my curiosity now, and I am going to have to learn a ton of chemistry to start to understand. Finally we are getting some actual scientific research on the matter. And it blows most commonly believed "food facts" out of the water.
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#39

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-19-2020, 08:37 PM)Dom Wrote:
(02-19-2020, 06:01 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-19-2020, 05:24 PM)Dom Wrote: [Image: meat-nutrients.png]

Fake news! Vitamin D2 is found in mushrooms! But to be fair, Vitamin D3 is the superior D. I've read that most people could use Vitamin D3 supplements regardless of diet.

You can eat supplements or you can eat the real thing. Thing with supplements is that they don't deliver everything the real thing does, and nutritional science, while getting better recently, still has a lot to explore.

Me, I'd rather eat the real thing and know more about what's going into my body.

I have been starting to learn about the involved science lately, and it's amazing what all chemical reactions happen (or don't happen) depending on what you put or don't put into your mouth. It's got my curiosity now, and I am going to have to learn a ton of chemistry to start to understand. Finally we are getting some actual scientific research on the matter. And it blows most commonly believed "food facts" out of the water.

Also let's not forget about the ultimate / primary source of Vitamin D

[Image: d130d7cf6763d5ccd8e3b6031149a897.gif]

We spend too much time indoors, that's why it's recommended most take supplements. Research shows the amount of Vitamin D in our bodies actually impacts how long we can live for. You may be interested in this lecture:

[Image: nL4L1haz_Qo04rZMFtdpyd1OZgZf9NSnR9-7hAWT...dc2a24480e]

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#40

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-19-2020, 10:09 PM)Aegon Wrote:
(02-19-2020, 08:37 PM)Dom Wrote:
(02-19-2020, 06:01 PM)Aegon Wrote: Fake news! Vitamin D2 is found in mushrooms! But to be fair, Vitamin D3 is the superior D. I've read that most people could use Vitamin D3 supplements regardless of diet.

You can eat supplements or you can eat the real thing. Thing with supplements is that they don't deliver everything the real thing does, and nutritional science, while getting better recently, still has a lot to explore.

Me, I'd rather eat the real thing and know more about what's going into my body.

I have been starting to learn about the involved science lately, and it's amazing what all chemical reactions happen (or don't happen) depending on what you put or don't put into your mouth. It's got my curiosity now, and I am going to have to learn a ton of chemistry to start to understand. Finally we are getting some actual scientific research on the matter. And it blows most commonly believed "food facts" out of the water.

Also let's not forget about the ultimate / primary source of Vitamin D

[Image: d130d7cf6763d5ccd8e3b6031149a897.gif]

We spend too much time indoors, that's why it's recommended most take supplements. Research shows the amount of Vitamin D in our bodies actually impacts how long we can live for. You may be interested in this lecture:


Unless it's smoggy, you have dark skin, you use a strong sunscreen, or wear long clothes and head coverings (burqas)  most people can absorb it that way. Milk and other common foods are enriched with vitamin D because rickets was running rampant, many people are not able to get it from the sun, even with adequate exposure.
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#41

Please stop trying to make fake meat
Quote:Subway offers only two core vegetarian sandwiches: the Veggie Delite, which is stuffed with fresh vegetables of your choice like lettuce, tomato, banana peppers and onion; and the Veggie Patty. A third, featuring cauliflower, is currently testing in Seattle and is set to launch in Baltimore on Feb. 27.

These aren’t your average florets, though. The new menu item is breaded, fried cauliflower fritters seasoned with onions and garlic. How do we know? Because we tried them.

Thanks to our friends at Subway, Daily Meal editors were able to sample two limited-edition wraps available at select restaurants in test markets. The first, Cauliflower Curry, comes in a spinach tortilla with cauliflower fritters, lettuce, red onion, green peppers, banana peppers and a brand-new curry sauce made with red pepper, basil, coconut milk, curry powder, red chili, garlic and ginger.

The second, Cauliflower Ranch, comes in a tomato basil wrap with cauliflower fritters, spinach, tomato, red onion, jalapeno and ranch dressing.

Is this new vegetarian-friendly option any good? Let’s talk about these fritters. If you gave them to someone without disclosing that they’re made of cauliflower, they’d probably think they were hash browns. The consistency isn’t cruciferous. It’s potatoey.

“The cauliflower breading has the flavor of a fast food chicken nugget, which I don’t hate, but it's a bit of a sodium bomb,” one editor said. “And while this new option is vegetarian, it doesn’t seem healthy.”

Technically, it’s not all that healthy. A footlong Cauliflower Curry wrap has 790 calories and Cauliflower Ranch has 820. Both have 15 grams of protein.

“I wish the cauliflower wasn't breaded,” another said. “Made it feel heavy and caloric. It felt like I was eating fast food. I feel less that way when eating a regular Subway sandwich.”

Most staffers came to the conclusion that they liked the wraps, but that they wouldn’t go out of their way to buy one if they were vegetarian. All but one preferred ranch over curry, which had a lot of different flavors going on. Looking at the sauce individually, it was quite all right.

“The curry sauce isn’t bad for a fast food place, speaking as a native eater,” said an editor who often consumes homemade curry.

(The Daily Meal)
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#42

Please stop trying to make fake meat
Cauliflower is widely used to substitute for potatoes or rice, even flour. You can make waffles or pizza dough using cauliflower and egg\cheese, you can boil cauliflower and grate it to make rice, or mash it to make mashed potatoes, etc. It all depends on the flavors you serve with it, it morphs easily.

Low carb diets use cauliflower extensively in place of grains and starches.
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#43

Please stop trying to make fake meat
I haven't tried any of these products, not because I'm against them but because in the UK the price for them is astronomical. I'd rather eat less meat and know it came from animals treated well and not ritually slaughtered than use synthetic/natural substitutes which may or may not measure up and cost a small fortune. I have a great recipe for a bacon vegetable and multiple bean casserole that is superb and only uses about 300g of  bacon off cuts. My personal view is that each person's diet is their own business and that globally its one of the few true freedoms of choice we have that actually means anything.
Something that's of far greater concern to many of us here in Britain is the introduction of halal meat by stealth to the population of the UK with no labeling, halal/kosher slaughter is horrible and I want to know that the meat I eat hasn't been slaughtered using those methods.
Justaminute   Flatten the curve its not just like flu! 
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#44

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-20-2020, 04:45 PM)adey67 Wrote: I haven't tried any of these products, not because I'm against them but because in the UK the price for them is astronomical...

Yep... same in Australia.  "Bio Cheese" is $32/kg, versus $12/kg for dairy-sourced cheddar cheese.

[Image: kl3phlk7rwd7j47huuzk.jpg]

It's designed of course to suck in the younger female health nutters, and makes several
dubious claims on its packaging.

Gluten free... so is dairy-sourced cheese,
Soya free... so is dairy,
Palm oil free... so is dairy,
GMO free... so is dairy,
Faith-based fasting... what does that even mean?
Dairy simulant... so fucking what?

A couple of shortcomings of Bio-Cheese is that it has 50% more sodium than dairy-sourced
cheese, and no protein at all.  Its saturated fat content is—surprisingly—similar to dairy sourced (19g versus 21g).
Bio-Cheese is made mostly from water and coconut oil, with a few added starch binders and
artificial colouring and flavouring.
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#45

Please stop trying to make fake meat
(02-20-2020, 08:30 PM)SYZ Wrote:
(02-20-2020, 04:45 PM)adey67 Wrote: I haven't tried any of these products, not because I'm against them but because in the UK the price for them is astronomical...

Yep... same in Australia.  "Bio Cheese" is $32/kg, versus $12/kg for dairy-sourced cheddar cheese.

[Image: kl3phlk7rwd7j47huuzk.jpg]

It's designed of course to suck in the younger female health nutters, and makes several
dubious claims on its packaging.

Gluten free... so is dairy-sourced cheese,
Soya free... so is dairy,
Palm oil free... so is dairy,
GMO free... so is dairy,
Faith-based fasting... what does that even mean?
Dairy simulant... so fucking what?

A couple of shortcomings of Bio-Cheese is that it has 50% more sodium than dairy-sourced
cheese, and no protein at all.  Its saturated fat content is—surprisingly—similar to dairy sourced (19g versus 21g).
Bio-Cheese is made mostly from water and coconut oil, with a few added starch binders and
artificial colouring and flavouring.

Palm oil - another food myth.

Palm oil may help protect brain function, reduce heart disease risk factors and increase vitamin A levels in certain people.


A large analysis of 51 studies found that total and LDL cholesterol levels were lower in people who followed palm oil-rich diets than those who consumed diets high in trans fats or myristic and lauric acid.

A recent three-month study looked at the cholesterol-lowering effects of palm oil made from a hybrid of Elaeis guineensis and Elaeis oleifera trees.

In this study, people consumed either 25 ml (2 tablespoons) of olive oil or a hybrid palm oil daily. Based on a 15% drop in LDL cholesterol in both groups, researchers suggested this palm oil could be called "the tropical equivalent of olive oil".
Nevertheless, it's important to note that an increase or decrease in LDL cholesterol levels alone cannot predict heart disease risk. There are many other factors involved.

However, a controlled study in 1995 suggested that palm oil might help slow disease progression in people with established heart disease.
In this 18-month study, seven of 25 people treated with the oil showed improvements and 16 remained stable. By contrast, 10 of 25 people in the placebo group experienced disease progression, and none showed improvement. 

Studies in pregnant women in developing countries have shown that consuming red palm oil increases vitamin A levels in their blood, as well as in their breastfed infants .

One study found that people with cystic fibrosis, who have difficulty absorbing fat-soluble vitamins, experienced an increase in blood levels of vitamin A after taking two to three tablespoons of red palm oil daily for eight weeks.


Palm oil is definitely better for you than most fats.
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